Now showing items 21-33 of 33

    • INTERFAITH OUTREACH OF THE MUSLIM WORLD LEAGUE: TRENDS, CAUSES, AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

      Khalid, Mohammad; Husain, Mohammad Khalid; No Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; General Education; 0; Khalid, Mohammad (Center for Study of Religions and Religious Tolerance, 2022-07-14)
      The Muslim World League is a nominally non-governmental Islamic organisation based in Saudi Arabia. From its founding in 1962 until relatively recently, it mainly focused on promulgating the archetypal Islamic fundamentals and practices across the Muslim world in line with the vision of the Saudi state. An early indicator that this mission was giving way to a more dynamic and, relatively, liberal position was an interfaith initiative by the league in 2008 that resulted in the Makkah Appeal; a landmark document that advocated, and set appropriate terms for, Islamic initiatives in interfaith dialogue. The league’s new interfaith programme was then introduced to the world ten days later when it convened the Madrid Conference, bringing together prominent figures from all major faith traditions. But it was not until 2016 / 2017 with the coming to office of its present secretary-general, Dr. Al-Issa, and the Saudi Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman, that the league radically expanded and diversified its interfaith dialogue initiatives. This article examines a mixed sample of these initiatives to give a sense of how the league’s interfaith programme has evolved in recent years. It then gives an analysis of the factors likely to be driving these changes, the aims they seem oriented to achieve, and what directions they might take in future. Special attention is paid to the league’s function and significance within the larger discourse of Saudi international relations and diplomatic interests on the world stage.
    • Understanding the Cohesion and Stability Issues of Pakistan: Appraisal & Solution

      Khalid, Mohammad; External Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; General Education; 0; Nadvi, Junaid (Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science & Technology, 2022)
      The Islamic Republic of Pakistan is becoming important in the international safety calculus. Cohesion and stability issues in Pakistan are a matter of concern and debate in academic and non-academic circles, on national and international forums. This article presents an appraisal with recommendations for a practical solution, in the light of religious, social, economic, and political feelings of its citizens. A different viewpoint on the cohesion and stability issues of Pakistan is being propagated in national and international media. The article does not criticize the opinions of others, but on the contrary, conceives a secure outlook for Pakistan. It conveys Qur’ān and Sunnah as two key resources synchronized with certain supplementary texts. The article claims that the pessimistic view about Pakistan can be improved by the elimination of internal chaos and resentments in the lifespan of its public; by the removal of difficulties, and insecurities, triggered by the warfare of terror, fear and distresses. The article claims that Pakistan was established on the tenets of Islamic Ideology. Therefore, the only feasible way to triumph over this alarming situation rests in the observance of those modest fundamentals, for which this land was envisioned and achieved by the Indian Muslims of the sub-continent.
    • JAHILIYYAH RHETORIC AS A DIVINE LEGITIMACY FOR VIOLENCE: A STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF SAYYID QUTB AND THE CONTEMPORARY ISLAMIST ORTHODOXY ONAL-QAEDA, THE TALIBAN, AND THE ISLAMIC STATE

      Khalid, Mohammad; No Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; General Education; 0; Khalid, Mohammad (Center for Study of Religions and Religious Tolerance, 2023)
      The Islamic conception of Jahiliyyah brings together the three most debated Muslim militant organizations of our times, namely Al-Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Taliban in terms of their justification for violence. It is discussed here that despite significant differences in their political agendas, social and cultural motives as well as religious denominational affiliations, the three organizations are hegemonic in their resort to the notion of Jahiliyyah while opposing the non-Shari’ah based political rule. They converge on the idea that there is an imperative to install a system based on Shari’ah and that any actors opposed to this can be treated as enemies, deviants, and infidels, hence, worthy of violent aggression. It is demonstrated here that this particular connotation of Jahiliyyah was essentially espoused in the works of Sayyid Qutb, one of the most influential twentieth century proponents of Islamism and global Jihad. Although developed primarily to denounce Western imperialists in a postcolonial context, one may see Jahiliyyah as a contemporary Islamic rhetoric for providing the three organizations in question, valid pretexts to wage armed insurgencies against whoever they view as hostile political forces. This overall narrative, as this study indicates, relates to the broader contemporary Islamist discourse on the legitimacy of political violence in the name of religion.
    • A Literary Critical Discourse on Quranic History in Seventh-Century Arabia

      Husain, Mohammad Khalid; External Collaboration; E-Arabaization Unit; 0; 0; General Education; 0; Elimam, Ahmed (University of Malaya, 2018-12-20)
      The Qur’an is the holy scripture of Islam. For Muslims, the Qur’an is the literal word of Allah revealed via the angel Gabriel to the last Prophet Muhammad who relayed the revelation, verbatim, to his followers. As one of the essential beliefs of Muslims, the Qur’an is inimitable in its composition and argue that, just as the earlier prophets of Allah were given the power to perform certain miracles to prove to their respective followers that they were genuine prophets, the Qur’an is the proof of Muhammad’s prophethood. Muslim scholars argue that the Arabs, whose literary tradition had reached its zenith just before the time of the revelation of the Qur’an, were fascinated by its style. Many of Prophet’s contemporaries acknowledged the Qur’an as a non-human or divine composition on hearing the recitation of some of its passages. This article sets out first of all to explore the Arabic literary tradition around the time of the revelation of the Qur’an, since it is against this background that their evaluation of the composition of the Qur’an may be understood and, secondly, to examine the relevant Islamic literature on the response of the Arabs to the Qur’an and finally shed some light on the inimitable style of the Qur’an.
    • Exploring the smart cities – energy communities nexus: issues and challenges

      Sokołowski, Maciej; Visvizi, Anna; University Collaboration; External Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; Master of Science in Urban Design; 0; Sokołowski, Maciej (Routledge, 2023-09-15)
    • Smart energy solutions: two-way energy information exchange between utility companies, consumers, and prosumers

      Kashef, Mohamad; Troisi, Orlando; Visvizi, Anna; University Collaboration; External Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; Architecture; 0; et al. (Routledge, 2023-09-15)
    • Higher education institutions in the post-Covid era: transformation through crisis and outstanding issues

      Visvizi, Anna; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Nawaz, Raheel; External Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; Entrepreneurship; 0; Visvizi, Anna (Routledge, 2023-09-22)
      The Covid-19 pandemic certainly was a cause of new challenges, but it has also exacerbated the already- existing weaknesses inherent in the ecosystem of higher education. The scope of institutional adaptation thus required was immense and remains both under-recognized and under-explored in the academic debate. The pace and depth of the transformation have not been even; institutional, political, legal, economic, and cultural factors were at play. No one-size-fits-all strategic approach to Covid-19 and its implications was possible. As law and regulatory efforts follow developments in society, several gaps and loopholes were left unattended in the early stage of the pandemic, thus frequently forcing HEIs to improvise. Notwithstanding the substantial and measurable degree of digital and institutional transformation HEIs attained, the pandemic left the fabric of the community of HEIs ruptured. Against this backdrop, this chapter outlines the key challenges and the takeaways, and makes a call for action.
    • Smart Cities and Households’ Recyclable Waste Management: The Case of Jeddah

      Saeedi, Kawther; Visvizi, Anna; Alahmadi, D.; Babour, A.; External Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; Supply Chain Management; 0; et al. (MDPI, 2023-04-17)
      Over the past 30 years, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has recorded rapid economic growth and development rates matched by corresponding levels of consumption. This has led to an exponential increase in the volume of municipal solid waste. Even if the bulk share of this waste is recyclable, the propensity of households to engage in the recycling of waste has so far produced a negligible effect. Arguably, in the context of the pervasive digitalization of public and private spaces, accompanied by the developments in information and communication technology (ICT), best conceptualized by reference to the concepts of smart cities and circular economy, it is natural to expect ICT and policy objectives to converge in order to encourage and enable greater engagement with waste segregation and recycling amongst households. Against this backdrop, this paper explores the feasibility and ways of increasing households’ participation in recyclable waste collection, segregation, and disposal in a context devoid of a top-down city-level waste management policy. To this end, the design thinking approach was employed to identify factors inhibiting/facilitating households’ engaging in recycling. A variety of ideation techniques were adopted in subsequent stages of the design thinking process, including interviews with stakeholders from the government and industry sectors, surveys with Jeddah households (N = 446), an eight week-long recyclable waste collection experiment, and feedback surveys (N = 46). The results suggest that applying relatively simple and resource-savvy tools aimed at promoting household recyclable waste collection has substantial potential. This, in turn, not only feeds into the debate on smart cities but also into the research of public policy.
    • Higher education institutions and the global digital transformation: beyond the question of which skills for the 21st century

      Visvizi, Anna; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Nawaz, Raheel; External Collaboration; NA; 0; 0; Entrepreneurship; 0; Visvizi, Anna (Routledge, 2023-09-22)
      The objective of this chapter is to collect the key takeaways of the chapters included in this book and to employ these takeaways in a discussion on HEIs (including the challenges they face and the responses to these that they generate) in times of the global digital transformation. What are the key challenges HEIs face? How to address these challenges? Which business models to implement? How to prepare students for successful careers? How to use the talent and intellectual capital pertaining to HEIs to allow HEIs to enlighten the society?
    • Increased Effectiveness of Schools through Ethical Educational Leadership

      Khalid, Mohammad; Kaj-Itani, Khadija; No Collaboration; NA; NA; General Education; NA; Kaj-Itani, Khadija (University of Bahrain, 2022-07-01)
      This case study focuses on two schools in Lebanon that have gained substantial recognition for providing high-quality education after their continuous success in the official General Secondary Exams. The supposed ethical leadership approach employed at these schools is studied here in order to examine whether it has played a role in their respective success. A number of stakeholders participated in the study through a survey, while eight people were interviewed including the two directors, the two principals, and the four coordinators. Further informal discussions were carried out with a couple of teachers outside the school premises. The analysis reveals a strong link between the highly relationship-oriented work environment at the schools under study and their noticeable success.
    • General Education at Effat University: A Value-Based Liberal Arts Teaching Model

      Kaj-Itani, Khadija; Khalid, Mohammad; Department Collaboration; General Education; Kaj-Itani, Khadija (AAC&U, 2019)
    • Increased Effectiveness of Schools through Ethical Educational Leadership

      Khalid, Mohammad; Kaj-Itani, Khadija; General Education (2022)
      This case study focuses on two schools in Lebanon that have gained substantial recognition for providing high-quality education after their continuous success in the official General Secondary Exams. The supposed ethical leadership approach employed at these schools is studied here in order to examine whether it has played a role in their respective success. A number of stakeholders participated in the study through a survey, while eight people were interviewed including the two directors, the two principals, and the four coordinators. Further informal discussions were carried out with a couple of teachers outside the school premises. The analysis reveals a strong link between the highly relationship-oriented work environment at the schools under study and their noticeable success.
    • Interfaith Outreach of the Muslim World League: trends, causes and futrue directions

      Khalid, Mohammad; General Education (14/7/2022)
      The Muslim World League is a nominally non-governmental Islamic organisation based in Saudi Arabia. From its founding in 1962 until relatively recently, it mainly focused on promulgating the archetypal Islamic fundamentals and practices across the Muslim world in line with the vision of the Saudi state. An early indicator that this mission was giving way to a more dynamic and, relatively, liberal position was an interfaith initiative by the league in 2008 that resulted in the Makkah Appeal. The league’s new interfaith programme was then introduced to the world ten days later when it convened the Madrid Conference. But it was not until 2016/2017 with the coming to office of its present secretary-general, Dr. Al-Issa, and the Saudi Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman, that the league radically expanded and diversified its interfaith dialogue initiatives. This article examines a mixed sample of these initiatives to give a sense of how the league’s interfaith programme has evolved in recent years. It then gives an analysis of the factors likely to be driving these changes, the aims they seem oriented to achieve, and what directions they might take in future.